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Poland Gifts India Sculptural Bust of Musician Fryderyk Chopin

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of 'Fryderyk Chopin' to the Director, National Gallery of Modern Art

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of “Fryderyk Chopin” to National Gallery of Modern Art as a gift from Poland to India. The bust was received by Director, National Gallery of Modern Art, Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India Shri Rajiv Lochan at a function in New Delhi. The 28 kg. brass bust of Fryderyk Chopin, painted in black colour is a creation of eminent Polish sculptor and art historian Prof. Adam Roman. Ambassador of France to India Jerome Bonnafont was also present on the occasion.

The Polish Parliament unanimously passed a vote to make the year 2010 a year of Fryderyk Chopin. This year marks the 200th birthday of this extraordinary composer and pianist.

One of the greatest musicians of the 19th century, Chopin was born on 1st March 1810 in the village of Zelazowa Wola near Warsaw. Chopin was a music composer and a maestro at playing the piano. From an early age, he was considered to be a child prodigy musician as he already had the talent of an adult skilled pianist.

By the age of six little Chopin tried to make up new melodies and he gave public performances by seven. When he was eleven years old, Chopin performed in front of Alexander I, the Tsar of Russia. His composition included songs and chamber music too. At an early age he also showed remarkable abilities in observation and sketching, akeen wit and sense of humor, and an uncommon talent for mimicry. An anecdote describes how Chopin helped quiet rowdy children by first improvising a story and then lulling them to sleep with a berceuse (lullaby)- after which he woke everyone with an ear-piercing chord.

At the age of 20, on 2 November 1830, he left Warsaw for Austria, intending to go on to Italy. He was one of many expatriates of the Polish Great Emigration. Chopin moved to Paris in 1831 where he lived for the rest of his short life. In Paris, he made a comfortable living as a composer and a virtuoso pianist.

Chopin died on 17th October 1849 in Paris at the age of 33. He is considered to be one of the greatest masters of romantic music. He is remembered as one of the first nationalist composers of Poland, using the themes and dances of his native Poland as the sources for his pieces specially the polonaises and mazurkas. His name and music have lived on for last 200 years and many more years to come.

- (from Press Information Bureau release)

Poland Gifts India Sculptural Bust of Musician Fryderyk Chopin

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of 'Fryderyk Chopin' to the Director, National Gallery of Modern Art

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of “Fryderyk Chopin” to National Gallery of Modern Art as a gift from Poland to India. The bust was received by Director, National Gallery of Modern Art, Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India Shri Rajiv Lochan at a function in New Delhi. The 28 kg. brass bust of Fryderyk Chopin, painted in black colour is a creation of eminent Polish sculptor and art historian Prof. Adam Roman. Ambassador of France to India Jerome Bonnafont was also present on the occasion.

The Polish Parliament unanimously passed a vote to make the year 2010 a year of Fryderyk Chopin. This year marks the 200th birthday of this extraordinary composer and pianist.

One of the greatest musicians of the 19th century, Chopin was born on 1st March 1810 in the village of Zelazowa Wola near Warsaw. Chopin was a music composer and a maestro at playing the piano. From an early age, he was considered to be a child prodigy musician as he already had the talent of an adult skilled pianist.

By the age of six little Chopin tried to make up new melodies and he gave public performances by seven. When he was eleven years old, Chopin performed in front of Alexander I, the Tsar of Russia. His composition included songs and chamber music too. At an early age he also showed remarkable abilities in observation and sketching, akeen wit and sense of humor, and an uncommon talent for mimicry. An anecdote describes how Chopin helped quiet rowdy children by first improvising a story and then lulling them to sleep with a berceuse (lullaby)- after which he woke everyone with an ear-piercing chord.

At the age of 20, on 2 November 1830, he left Warsaw for Austria, intending to go on to Italy. He was one of many expatriates of the Polish Great Emigration. Chopin moved to Paris in 1831 where he lived for the rest of his short life. In Paris, he made a comfortable living as a composer and a virtuoso pianist.

Chopin died on 17th October 1849 in Paris at the age of 33. He is considered to be one of the greatest masters of romantic music. He is remembered as one of the first nationalist composers of Poland, using the themes and dances of his native Poland as the sources for his pieces specially the polonaises and mazurkas. His name and music have lived on for last 200 years and many more years to come.

- (from Press Information Bureau release)

Poland Gifts India Sculptural Bust of Musician Fryderyk Chopin

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of 'Fryderyk Chopin' to the Director, National Gallery of Modern Art

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of “Fryderyk Chopin” to National Gallery of Modern Art as a gift from Poland to India. The bust was received by Director, National Gallery of Modern Art, Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India Shri Rajiv Lochan at a function in New Delhi. The 28 kg. brass bust of Fryderyk Chopin, painted in black colour is a creation of eminent Polish sculptor and art historian Prof. Adam Roman. Ambassador of France to India Jerome Bonnafont was also present on the occasion.

The Polish Parliament unanimously passed a vote to make the year 2010 a year of Fryderyk Chopin. This year marks the 200th birthday of this extraordinary composer and pianist.

One of the greatest musicians of the 19th century, Chopin was born on 1st March 1810 in the village of Zelazowa Wola near Warsaw. Chopin was a music composer and a maestro at playing the piano. From an early age, he was considered to be a child prodigy musician as he already had the talent of an adult skilled pianist.

By the age of six little Chopin tried to make up new melodies and he gave public performances by seven. When he was eleven years old, Chopin performed in front of Alexander I, the Tsar of Russia. His composition included songs and chamber music too. At an early age he also showed remarkable abilities in observation and sketching, akeen wit and sense of humor, and an uncommon talent for mimicry. An anecdote describes how Chopin helped quiet rowdy children by first improvising a story and then lulling them to sleep with a berceuse (lullaby)- after which he woke everyone with an ear-piercing chord.

At the age of 20, on 2 November 1830, he left Warsaw for Austria, intending to go on to Italy. He was one of many expatriates of the Polish Great Emigration. Chopin moved to Paris in 1831 where he lived for the rest of his short life. In Paris, he made a comfortable living as a composer and a virtuoso pianist.

Chopin died on 17th October 1849 in Paris at the age of 33. He is considered to be one of the greatest masters of romantic music. He is remembered as one of the first nationalist composers of Poland, using the themes and dances of his native Poland as the sources for his pieces specially the polonaises and mazurkas. His name and music have lived on for last 200 years and many more years to come.

Malgorzata Tusk

Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of 'Fryderyk Chopin' to the Director, National Gallery of Modern Art

Mrs. Malgorzata Tusk, wife of Prime Minister of Poland handed over the sculptural Bust of ‘Fryderyk Chopin’ to the Director, National Gallery of Modern Art, Ministry of Culture, Shri Rajiv Lochan, at a function, in New Delhi on September 07, 2010.

Empowerment of Teachers

Dr. Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

I am indeed very happy to be with you today, on the eve of Teachers’ Day. We celebrate 5th September, the birth anniversary of Dr Radhakrishnan, our former President, as Teachers’ Day all over the country to honour and to express our nation’s gratitude to all teachers for their dedicated service to the nation. Teachers’ Day is the ideal day of telling our teachers that we feel blessed because of their presence in our lives. I join you in remembering Dr Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, the great scholar, the great philosopher, the great teacher and above all a great educationist.

Teaching has always been considered a noble profession. My own years as a teacher have been the most satisfying and fulfilling in my life. Through teachers flow the values and culture of a nation and its people. Teachers’ own value system, their character and their behaviour directly influence our children. But, misinformation and limited learning behaviours, that children sometimes internalize, can also be traced back to teachers’ lack of knowledge, poor understanding, or biases. We must guard against these negative features.

Teachers are invariably seen as front-line participants in educational reform, critical to successful quality schooling in our country. But, sadly, teachers are often excluded from policy-making, governance and management of our educational system as also from day-to-day instructional strategies and decision making. In our endeavour for educational reforms we must, therefore, emphasize the empowerment of teachers and that includes real opportunity for them to share policy perspectives and decision-making in pursuit of educational development and reforms. It is my belief that all teachers are creative, talented people; teachers respond remarkably when they are respected and included in the decision-making integral to their work in the classroom. They gain a sense of ownership over their work and their classrooms, when they are involved in the development of the curriculum, designing of the syllabus, making and selecting of teaching materials and in training programmes leading to their own intellectual and professional development.

One critical area that all teachers must reflect upon is equality and inclusiveness of our educational system. Numerous programmes have been initiated in our country that focus on equality and inclusiveness paying particular attention to the girl child, or children from the scheduled caste or scheduled tribe or minority communities, or for differently-abled children with special needs and problems. Such programmes will result in an empowered youth and citizenship, only if their teachers are empowered supporters of equality and inclusiveness. If efforts to increase student access, learning and retention in elementary and secondary education are to succeed and make headway, relevant and empowering teacher education is of critical importance. This is particularly true of women teachers who must serve as positive role models for our society at large.

Our Government is committed to provide quality education to all. The Right to Education Act was passed by the Parliament last year. The Right to Education Act and Article 21-A of our Constitution guaranteeing elementary education as a Fundamental Right, have now become operational with effect from 1st April 2010. I compliment and pay tribute to my colleague Shri Kapil Sibal for the zeal, dedication and enthusiasm that he has brought to bear on the work of this most important ministry of Union Government, that Human Resource Development Ministry is. I had on that occasion addressed the nation and recounted my own childhood experience of studying in extremely difficult and adverse circumstances. Time has come for all of us to change this situation and ensure that every child in this country of ours has the opportunity to exercise his or her right to an education of equitable quality, and thereby making the Right to Education a grand national movement. Today, you have both challenge and opportunity to provide good quality education to all our children. Through you, our nation aspires to build in our children a commitment to the values of democracy, and the values of equality, justice, freedom, secularism, respect for human dignity and human rights. I urge you to develop in our children independence of thought, action and capacity of carefully considered, decision making which is based on reason and understanding. Through you, our children must develop a sensitivity to others’ well-being and feelings. Through you, our children must develop the ability to work and participate in economic and social processes and in processes of social change.

These aspirations for our children necessarily mean that the school environment should be free from fear, trauma and anxiety. No child, irrespective of caste, gender or community to which he or she belongs should dread the thought of going to school. The RTE Act bans corporal punishment and mental harassment. It also bans detention and expulsion. These provisions have led many teachers to question how discipline will be maintained in the classroom. The answer to this important issue was given by the well known philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti: “Discipline is an easy way to control a child, but it does not help him to understand the problems involved in living… If the teacher can give full attention to each child, observing and helping him, then compulsion or domination or discipline in any form may be unnecessary”.

The educational system in our country is at a very critical juncture. We have to maintain the fine balance between tradition and continuity, between tradition and modernity on the one hand, and innovation and change on the other. As teachers, you are the most important nation builders, you constitute our nation’s most precious national resource, and we look to you to guide our children in their quest for knowledge, truth and in their capacity to lead a life of dignity and self respect.

With these words, I congratulate each one of you – the distinguished Teacher Awardees – on winning this very prestigious national award. It is a small token of our nation’s gratitude to the great fraternity of teachers in our country. On the occasion of the Teachers Day I extend my heartfelt warm greetings to all members of the teaching community and wish each one of you success and fulfillment in your personal life and vocation.

(The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh’s address for the Awardee Teachers on the eve of Teachers’ Day in New Delhi.)

Empowerment of Teachers

Dr. Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

I am indeed very happy to be with you today, on the eve of Teachers’ Day. We celebrate 5th September, the birth anniversary of Dr Radhakrishnan, our former President, as Teachers’ Day all over the country to honour and to express our nation’s gratitude to all teachers for their dedicated service to the nation. Teachers’ Day is the ideal day of telling our teachers that we feel blessed because of their presence in our lives. I join you in remembering Dr Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, the great scholar, the great philosopher, the great teacher and above all a great educationist.

Teaching has always been considered a noble profession. My own years as a teacher have been the most satisfying and fulfilling in my life. Through teachers flow the values and culture of a nation and its people. Teachers’ own value system, their character and their behaviour directly influence our children. But, misinformation and limited learning behaviours, that children sometimes internalize, can also be traced back to teachers’ lack of knowledge, poor understanding, or biases. We must guard against these negative features.

Teachers are invariably seen as front-line participants in educational reform, critical to successful quality schooling in our country. But, sadly, teachers are often excluded from policy-making, governance and management of our educational system as also from day-to-day instructional strategies and decision making. In our endeavour for educational reforms we must, therefore, emphasize the empowerment of teachers and that includes real opportunity for them to share policy perspectives and decision-making in pursuit of educational development and reforms. It is my belief that all teachers are creative, talented people; teachers respond remarkably when they are respected and included in the decision-making integral to their work in the classroom. They gain a sense of ownership over their work and their classrooms, when they are involved in the development of the curriculum, designing of the syllabus, making and selecting of teaching materials and in training programmes leading to their own intellectual and professional development.

One critical area that all teachers must reflect upon is equality and inclusiveness of our educational system. Numerous programmes have been initiated in our country that focus on equality and inclusiveness paying particular attention to the girl child, or children from the scheduled caste or scheduled tribe or minority communities, or for differently-abled children with special needs and problems. Such programmes will result in an empowered youth and citizenship, only if their teachers are empowered supporters of equality and inclusiveness. If efforts to increase student access, learning and retention in elementary and secondary education are to succeed and make headway, relevant and empowering teacher education is of critical importance. This is particularly true of women teachers who must serve as positive role models for our society at large.

Our Government is committed to provide quality education to all. The Right to Education Act was passed by the Parliament last year. The Right to Education Act and Article 21-A of our Constitution guaranteeing elementary education as a Fundamental Right, have now become operational with effect from 1st April 2010. I compliment and pay tribute to my colleague Shri Kapil Sibal for the zeal, dedication and enthusiasm that he has brought to bear on the work of this most important ministry of Union Government, that Human Resource Development Ministry is. I had on that occasion addressed the nation and recounted my own childhood experience of studying in extremely difficult and adverse circumstances. Time has come for all of us to change this situation and ensure that every child in this country of ours has the opportunity to exercise his or her right to an education of equitable quality, and thereby making the Right to Education a grand national movement. Today, you have both challenge and opportunity to provide good quality education to all our children. Through you, our nation aspires to build in our children a commitment to the values of democracy, and the values of equality, justice, freedom, secularism, respect for human dignity and human rights. I urge you to develop in our children independence of thought, action and capacity of carefully considered, decision making which is based on reason and understanding. Through you, our children must develop a sensitivity to others’ well-being and feelings. Through you, our children must develop the ability to work and participate in economic and social processes and in processes of social change.

These aspirations for our children necessarily mean that the school environment should be free from fear, trauma and anxiety. No child, irrespective of caste, gender or community to which he or she belongs should dread the thought of going to school. The RTE Act bans corporal punishment and mental harassment. It also bans detention and expulsion. These provisions have led many teachers to question how discipline will be maintained in the classroom. The answer to this important issue was given by the well known philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti: “Discipline is an easy way to control a child, but it does not help him to understand the problems involved in living… If the teacher can give full attention to each child, observing and helping him, then compulsion or domination or discipline in any form may be unnecessary”.

The educational system in our country is at a very critical juncture. We have to maintain the fine balance between tradition and continuity, between tradition and modernity on the one hand, and innovation and change on the other. As teachers, you are the most important nation builders, you constitute our nation’s most precious national resource, and we look to you to guide our children in their quest for knowledge, truth and in their capacity to lead a life of dignity and self respect.

With these words, I congratulate each one of you – the distinguished Teacher Awardees – on winning this very prestigious national award. It is a small token of our nation’s gratitude to the great fraternity of teachers in our country. On the occasion of the Teachers Day I extend my heartfelt warm greetings to all members of the teaching community and wish each one of you success and fulfillment in your personal life and vocation.

(The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh’s address for the Awardee Teachers on the eve of Teachers’ Day in New Delhi.)

Empowerment of Teachers

Dr. Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

I am indeed very happy to be with you today, on the eve of Teachers’ Day. We celebrate 5th September, the birth anniversary of Dr Radhakrishnan, our former President, as Teachers’ Day all over the country to honour and to express our nation’s gratitude to all teachers for their dedicated service to the nation. Teachers’ Day is the ideal day of telling our teachers that we feel blessed because of their presence in our lives. I join you in remembering Dr Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, the great scholar, the great philosopher, the great teacher and above all a great educationist.

Teaching has always been considered a noble profession. My own years as a teacher have been the most satisfying and fulfilling in my life. Through teachers flow the values and culture of a nation and its people. Teachers’ own value system, their character and their behaviour directly influence our children. But, misinformation and limited learning behaviours, that children sometimes internalize, can also be traced back to teachers’ lack of knowledge, poor understanding, or biases. We must guard against these negative features.

Teachers are invariably seen as front-line participants in educational reform, critical to successful quality schooling in our country. But, sadly, teachers are often excluded from policy-making, governance and management of our educational system as also from day-to-day instructional strategies and decision making. In our endeavour for educational reforms we must, therefore, emphasize the empowerment of teachers and that includes real opportunity for them to share policy perspectives and decision-making in pursuit of educational development and reforms. It is my belief that all teachers are creative, talented people; teachers respond remarkably when they are respected and included in the decision-making integral to their work in the classroom. They gain a sense of ownership over their work and their classrooms, when they are involved in the development of the curriculum, designing of the syllabus, making and selecting of teaching materials and in training programmes leading to their own intellectual and professional development.

One critical area that all teachers must reflect upon is equality and inclusiveness of our educational system. Numerous programmes have been initiated in our country that focus on equality and inclusiveness paying particular attention to the girl child, or children from the scheduled caste or scheduled tribe or minority communities, or for differently-abled children with special needs and problems. Such programmes will result in an empowered youth and citizenship, only if their teachers are empowered supporters of equality and inclusiveness. If efforts to increase student access, learning and retention in elementary and secondary education are to succeed and make headway, relevant and empowering teacher education is of critical importance. This is particularly true of women teachers who must serve as positive role models for our society at large.

Our Government is committed to provide quality education to all. The Right to Education Act was passed by the Parliament last year. The Right to Education Act and Article 21-A of our Constitution guaranteeing elementary education as a Fundamental Right, have now become operational with effect from 1st April 2010. I compliment and pay tribute to my colleague Shri Kapil Sibal for the zeal, dedication and enthusiasm that he has brought to bear on the work of this most important ministry of Union Government, that Human Resource Development Ministry is. I had on that occasion addressed the nation and recounted my own childhood experience of studying in extremely difficult and adverse circumstances. Time has come for all of us to change this situation and ensure that every child in this country of ours has the opportunity to exercise his or her right to an education of equitable quality, and thereby making the Right to Education a grand national movement. Today, you have both challenge and opportunity to provide good quality education to all our children. Through you, our nation aspires to build in our children a commitment to the values of democracy, and the values of equality, justice, freedom, secularism, respect for human dignity and human rights. I urge you to develop in our children independence of thought, action and capacity of carefully considered, decision making which is based on reason and understanding. Through you, our children must develop a sensitivity to others’ well-being and feelings. Through you, our children must develop the ability to work and participate in economic and social processes and in processes of social change.

These aspirations for our children necessarily mean that the school environment should be free from fear, trauma and anxiety. No child, irrespective of caste, gender or community to which he or she belongs should dread the thought of going to school. The RTE Act bans corporal punishment and mental harassment. It also bans detention and expulsion. These provisions have led many teachers to question how discipline will be maintained in the classroom. The answer to this important issue was given by the well known philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti: “Discipline is an easy way to control a child, but it does not help him to understand the problems involved in living… If the teacher can give full attention to each child, observing and helping him, then compulsion or domination or discipline in any form may be unnecessary”.

The educational system in our country is at a very critical juncture. We have to maintain the fine balance between tradition and continuity, between tradition and modernity on the one hand, and innovation and change on the other. As teachers, you are the most important nation builders, you constitute our nation’s most precious national resource, and we look to you to guide our children in their quest for knowledge, truth and in their capacity to lead a life of dignity and self respect.

With these words, I congratulate each one of you – the distinguished Teacher Awardees – on winning this very prestigious national award. It is a small token of our nation’s gratitude to the great fraternity of teachers in our country. On the occasion of the Teachers Day I extend my heartfelt warm greetings to all members of the teaching community and wish each one of you success and fulfillment in your personal life and vocation.

(The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh’s address for the Awardee Teachers on the eve of Teachers’ Day in New Delhi.)

Empowerment of Teachers

Dr. Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

I am indeed very happy to be with you today, on the eve of Teachers’ Day. We celebrate 5th September, the birth anniversary of Dr Radhakrishnan, our former President, as Teachers’ Day all over the country to honour and to express our nation’s gratitude to all teachers for their dedicated service to the nation. Teachers’ Day is the ideal day of telling our teachers that we feel blessed because of their presence in our lives. I join you in remembering Dr Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, the great scholar, the great philosopher, the great teacher and above all a great educationist.

Teaching has always been considered a noble profession. My own years as a teacher have been the most satisfying and fulfilling in my life. Through teachers flow the values and culture of a nation and its people. Teachers’ own value system, their character and their behaviour directly influence our children. But, misinformation and limited learning behaviours, that children sometimes internalize, can also be traced back to teachers’ lack of knowledge, poor understanding, or biases. We must guard against these negative features.

Teachers are invariably seen as front-line participants in educational reform, critical to successful quality schooling in our country. But, sadly, teachers are often excluded from policy-making, governance and management of our educational system as also from day-to-day instructional strategies and decision making. In our endeavour for educational reforms we must, therefore, emphasize the empowerment of teachers and that includes real opportunity for them to share policy perspectives and decision-making in pursuit of educational development and reforms. It is my belief that all teachers are creative, talented people; teachers respond remarkably when they are respected and included in the decision-making integral to their work in the classroom. They gain a sense of ownership over their work and their classrooms, when they are involved in the development of the curriculum, designing of the syllabus, making and selecting of teaching materials and in training programmes leading to their own intellectual and professional development.

One critical area that all teachers must reflect upon is equality and inclusiveness of our educational system. Numerous programmes have been initiated in our country that focus on equality and inclusiveness paying particular attention to the girl child, or children from the scheduled caste or scheduled tribe or minority communities, or for differently-abled children with special needs and problems. Such programmes will result in an empowered youth and citizenship, only if their teachers are empowered supporters of equality and inclusiveness. If efforts to increase student access, learning and retention in elementary and secondary education are to succeed and make headway, relevant and empowering teacher education is of critical importance. This is particularly true of women teachers who must serve as positive role models for our society at large.

Our Government is committed to provide quality education to all. The Right to Education Act was passed by the Parliament last year. The Right to Education Act and Article 21-A of our Constitution guaranteeing elementary education as a Fundamental Right, have now become operational with effect from 1st April 2010. I compliment and pay tribute to my colleague Shri Kapil Sibal for the zeal, dedication and enthusiasm that he has brought to bear on the work of this most important ministry of Union Government, that Human Resource Development Ministry is. I had on that occasion addressed the nation and recounted my own childhood experience of studying in extremely difficult and adverse circumstances. Time has come for all of us to change this situation and ensure that every child in this country of ours has the opportunity to exercise his or her right to an education of equitable quality, and thereby making the Right to Education a grand national movement. Today, you have both challenge and opportunity to provide good quality education to all our children. Through you, our nation aspires to build in our children a commitment to the values of democracy, and the values of equality, justice, freedom, secularism, respect for human dignity and human rights. I urge you to develop in our children independence of thought, action and capacity of carefully considered, decision making which is based on reason and understanding. Through you, our children must develop a sensitivity to others’ well-being and feelings. Through you, our children must develop the ability to work and participate in economic and social processes and in processes of social change.

These aspirations for our children necessarily mean that the school environment should be free from fear, trauma and anxiety. No child, irrespective of caste, gender or community to which he or she belongs should dread the thought of going to school. The RTE Act bans corporal punishment and mental harassment. It also bans detention and expulsion. These provisions have led many teachers to question how discipline will be maintained in the classroom. The answer to this important issue was given by the well known philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti: “Discipline is an easy way to control a child, but it does not help him to understand the problems involved in living… If the teacher can give full attention to each child, observing and helping him, then compulsion or domination or discipline in any form may be unnecessary”.

The educational system in our country is at a very critical juncture. We have to maintain the fine balance between tradition and continuity, between tradition and modernity on the one hand, and innovation and change on the other. As teachers, you are the most important nation builders, you constitute our nation’s most precious national resource, and we look to you to guide our children in their quest for knowledge, truth and in their capacity to lead a life of dignity and self respect.

With these words, I congratulate each one of you – the distinguished Teacher Awardees – on winning this very prestigious national award. It is a small token of our nation’s gratitude to the great fraternity of teachers in our country. On the occasion of the Teachers Day I extend my heartfelt warm greetings to all members of the teaching community and wish each one of you success and fulfillment in your personal life and vocation.

(The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh’s address the Awardee Teachers on the eve of Teachers’ Day in New Delhi.)

Harsh Mander’s ‘Unsuni’ on 8th Sept

ansuniAsmita theatre group will present ‘UNSUNI’ based on Harsh Mander’s book ‘Unheard Voices’ on 8th Sept on 11.30 AM. The script is written by Mallika Sarabhai & it is directed by Arvind Gaur. The place will be Kalyan Kendra 9, Paschimi Marg, Vasant Vihar in New Delhi.

‘Unsuni’ – Unsuni is a socially relevant and politically deep script by Mallika Sarabhai, based on the Novel “Unheard Voices” …by Harsh Mander. In a Society where the success of a handful makes biger news than the misery of millions, a s…et of 5 monologues dares to speak out for the mute, the desolate, the chronically ignored a woefully unloved India, full of People but starved of life.Unsuni lifts the veil around harsh realities faced by the diversity afflicted people of our country.

Street urchins abandoned by society to fend for themselves in the face of adversity; tribal people forced to surrender their honour to repacious land grabbers; scavengers and lepers who have never known the meaning of human dignity are some specific problems addressed by the play. The volatile nature of religious politics coupled with an incompetent judicial structure is also portrayed with grave honesty. In the depiction of all these causes is a common underlying plea for us to open our eyes to the bigger picture, to share that human worth which we for ourselves claim as a right, but deprive others of without justification.The play overall is an intense reminder of horrors towards which we voluntarily turn a deaf ear. It does not aim to downplay the success of those who do make it to the top, but is a call to the privileged to consider those who deserve equal rights, but lack equal opportunity.

Harsh Mander’s ‘Unsuni’ on 8th Sept

ansuniAsmita theatre group will present ‘UNSUNI’ based on Harsh Mander’s book ‘Unheard Voices’ on 8th Sept on 11.30 AM. The script is written by Mallika Sarabhai & it is directed by Arvind Gaur. The place will be Kalyan Kendra 9, Paschimi Marg, Vasant Vihar in New Delhi.

‘Unsuni’ – Unsuni is a socially relevant and politically deep script by Mallika Sarabhai, based on the Novel “Unheard Voices” …by Harsh Mander. In a Society where the success of a handful makes biger news than the misery of millions, a s…et of 5 monologues dares to speak out for the mute, the desolate, the chronically ignored a woefully unloved India, full of People but starved of life.Unsuni lifts the veil around harsh realities faced by the diversity afflicted people of our country.

Street urchins abandoned by society to fend for themselves in the face of adversity; tribal people forced to surrender their honour to repacious land grabbers; scavengers and lepers who have never known the meaning of human dignity are some specific problems addressed by the play. The volatile nature of religious politics coupled with an incompetent judicial structure is also portrayed with grave honesty. In the depiction of all these causes is a common underlying plea for us to open our eyes to the bigger picture, to share that human worth which we for ourselves claim as a right, but deprive others of without justification.The play overall is an intense reminder of horrors towards which we voluntarily turn a deaf ear. It does not aim to downplay the success of those who do make it to the top, but is a call to the privileged to consider those who deserve equal rights, but lack equal opportunity.

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