The Shifting Sands of Kanjar Hinterland

by Anup Beniwal

Bhagwandas Morval

Bhagwandas Morval

A formidable presence in contemporary Hindi literature, Bhagwandass Morwal has been hailed as the chronicler of Mewat, the land of his birth and nurture. Straddling Rajasthan, UP and Haryana, the region of Mewat, despite its unique cultural compositeness, lies on the socio-economic margins of India. The creative contours of Morwals much hailed Kala Pahad (1999) and Babal Tera Des Mein (2004) are shaped by the shifting sounds, sights and sensibility of Mewat that are as much rooted in the individual experiences of the author as in the collective memory of the region. However, the consumerist-communalist onslaught of the contemporary, in the guise of modernity, progress and vote-politics, has started asserting both due and undue pressure on the composite Mewati life style. Morwal makes this experiential reality, a poignant blend of memory and desire, emotion and thought, the takeoff point of his creative imagination to offer a fictional glimpse into the present day Mewat. As such his narratives are in the service of common people; they take sustenance from the existential aspirations and inspirations of the laity, pitchforks it within the social, economic and political contours of contemporary India to present a simultaneous critique both of the local and the national, the subaltern and the mainstream.

Ret, Morwals latest novel marks a transition both a departure and continuity in his narrative-aesthetic oeuvre. Though he moves away from his conventional creative turf in Ret, yet he persists with his imaginative and ideological sympathies. Ret is a story of Kanjars, a tribal community of North India, and the shifting matrix of their lives and times at the cross-section of caste, class, gender and community. It provides an anthropological peep into the psyche of a community precariously positioned at the margins of a society as the nation trudges along on its way to democratic equality, social justice and empowerment; a peep that soon implicates both the writer and readers as involved interpreters of this trajectory.

At the centre of the story lie the inhabitants of Kamala Sadan, presided over by Kamala Bua, the grand matriarch of this Kanjar family. The narrative is woven around the economics of the body and the way this economics impinges on the culture and everyday relational and existential dynamics of Kanjars, especially the Kanjar women. In the very process of capturing and interpreting the complex and contradictory aspect of their everyday reality, the author weaves an engrossing tale that treads a thin line between fact and fiction, imagination and exotica, but, nevertheless, with a pulsating human sensitivity.

Ret, however, is not a maiden foray into tribal hinterland. A tradition of tribal writing already exists in Hindi and, in fact, constitutes a distinct sub-genre in Hindi literature. Kab Tak Pukarun by Rangaye Raghav, Shailoosh by Shivprasad Singh, Alma Kabootri by Maitree Pushpa, Picchhle Panne Ki Auratein by Sharad Singh are some of the important literary works that have helped forge this creative subgenre. But Ret is different from its predecessors in the sense that, in making Kanjars the centre of his narrative, Morwal brings a comparatively unknown but much misunderstood tribal face of India to the literary and hence discursive center-stage. In contrast his predecessors, except Sharad Singh, have mostly focused on Nats, a tribe traditionally closer to mainstream life and imagination. At the receiving end of mainstream social imagery as uncouth, immoral and literally untouchables, Kanjars have traditionally been ostracized by their surrounding communities and pushed into isolation, and socio-political wilderness. Moreover, Morwal has been able to capture his narrative subject without eroticizing, exoticizing or othering it. He opens up for his readers a realm of life with rare maturity and restrain that does not let it turn into a sensational stuff or slogan. Though realistic and even graphic in details, Morwal is never frivolous in intent.

Beginning on a rather dramatic note encapsulating the existential predicament of Kanjar women, the narrative evolves as a historio-cultural and communitarian topography of Gaajuki, a Kanjar inhabitation, tucked away from the National Highway, yet enticingly close to it. This proximity and distance, the socio-cultural and spatio-temporal hiatus, apart from acting as an organic and metaphoric backdrop to Gaajuki, also patterns the personal and professional lives of its inhabitants. Positioning himself into this narrative through the persona of Vaidji, an involved-outsider, Morwal offers a women-sensitive and centric peep into Kanjar life; he guides the readers through the intricacies of their culture specific customs such as Matha Dhakai, haggling over bride-price during matrimonial alliances, the feudal underpinnings of mehfils, the working of tribal panchayats and their arbitration-rituals like dharod , their religious and social beliefs and their various encounters with the state and outer society in the form of police, politicians, izzatdars, kajjas and sex customers. This community of Kanjars, virtually insulated, and even jealously guarding itself from the outside world, is, within itself, surprisingly uninhibited, despite its rigid social and moral codes. It is a world whose socio-economic and conceptual matrix is woven around the notion of khilawadies, buas and bhabhies. These cultural notions not only structure the lives of Kanjar women but, in constituting their life trajectories, imbue Ret with a rare narrative potential. Having grounded the readers into Kanjar consciousness and conscience, Morwal shifts focus to tell the story of Rukmini. By far the most engaging character of the novel, her tale etches out the contours of individual and collective resistance and empowerment of Kanjar/tribal woman. Wriggling her way through the social norms, economic and political potentials of the body, the bureaucratic and political matrix of the mainstream and even gender-competition from within and outside the community, she makes a palpable dent in power-politics of the day.

It is this narrative strand, the constitutive contours and direction of this empowerment trajectory that reveals the strengths and weaknesses of Morwals poetics and politics in Ret. An exclusive focus on this trajectory seems to belie the initial potential of the narrative in the sense that instead of culminating into a nuanced and inclusive tale of the community, the novel tends to become a predictable quest of an individual. No doubt, Rukmini by her virtue of unique location/subjectivity is no run of the mill character. As a matter of fact she is a representation of a complex cultural trope. But in making her exclusive focus of Rets latter narrative, Morwal compromises with numerous strands of his inherently ambitious narrative canvass. The stories of Santo and to an extant Pinky, which otherwise were pregnant with possibilities, for example, are left incomplete or unresolved. As a consequence the narrative that begins with a bang ends in many diffused whimpers. The overall impression that an expectant Morwal reader is left with is that of a narrative cobbled up in a hurry, using all the ploys of popular fiction, namely, suspense and mystery (the long and ill/unexplained absences of Rukmini from Gaajuki for instance); rivalry, intrigue and one-up-man-ship; a heady mix of Kanjar whisky and raw sexuality coupled with an intriguing blend of unarticulated romance and unrequited sensuousness simmering beneath the surface.

On the face of it even the journey of Rukminis political success, premised as it is on the transactional sex and political cunning, appears more as a case of ambiguous and opportunistic rather than genuine empowerment of the subaltern/Kanjar woman; it doesnt gel with the apparently progressive thrust of the narrative and even fails to address comprehensively the underlying structural inequalities that the novel seeks to unravel. However, a patient and sensitive reading and Morwals narratives demand it helps put this empowering trajectory in proper perspective. It is not the economic empowerment that Rukmini or other Kanjar women in the novel are seeking; they are surprisingly affluent and display this affluence to the hilt on occasions that demand it. It is the social and political power that they lack. Rukminis eventual political empowerment is only a culmination of the agential/self conscious exercise of the choices that her context offers her, when her circumstances and convictions virtually push her into a blind alley. In refusing to be an available body, i.e., in asserting moral and professional right over her body within the normative closures of her trade/culture, she withstands the gaze of the appropriatory/alien/colonizing masculinity/power and in the process comes face to face with the emancipatory potentials of her body. This renewed awareness of the body or deh-darshan, as the author succinctly describes it, has the necessary wherewithal of empowerment. It proves to be an identity endowing amalgam of agency, choice and power for Rukmini with its roots in Kanjar ethos and worldview. In short, the transformation in Rukminis life indicates a qualitative shift from body as tool of survival/commerce to body as a tool of power, and this shift in body praxis, and the way Rukmini exploits it pragmatically, is perhaps the only viable option available to her, given the realities that surround her. Both sinned against and sinning, Rukmini, nevertheless, brings out the hollowness of contemporary political system and also helps problematise extant feminist positions by turning discourses on sexuality and economic empowerment on their heads.

An active and affirmative interface between the folk, popular and the modern is a distinguishing feature of Morwals narrative style. Ret is no exception. Caught in a dramatic situation, one is not only strategically positioned in the midst of the fictional events, but also finds ones self immersed, ever so tantalizingly, into Morwals enticing narrative/communicative texture. Culled from folk sensibility, his vocabulary not only authenticates the experience he depicts, but also makes it more nuanced and textured. Creativity for Morwal entails a simultaneous process of language augmentation; by co-opting culture specific idioms he not only reclaims them in Hindi but also turns them literary. Ret is replete with such linguistic sedimentation. And all through, Morwal is ever-present to guide the reader through the cultural milieu of his narratives in his own unique style. This narrative style is premised on a stimulating author-reader partnership, a unique kissagoi that is an amalgam of the folk and popular in expression, objective in analysis and democratic in spirit. It is an art of story telling where the artist picks up episodes which run into and out of each other. Morwal has often been criticized for the rawness of his plots and style. But in Ret this rawness seems to be a deliberate ploy that imparts its deceptive simplicity and endows it with a structurally suited episodic and narrative spontaneity. In fact, this apparent puerility of form, being a function of the lived/empathized, emerges as a typical signature of Morwals fiction.

If the crux of creativity lies in becoming one with ones imaginative territory and, in the process, resurrecting the human possibilities within its life problematic, Morwals Ret admirably qualifies this creative test. Herein the folk sensibility is organically enmeshed within its spatio-temporal dynamics, constitutes and is constituted by it. The folk confronts, collides and colludes with the contemporary. The dialectics of this interaction impinges on the existential dynamics of the folk in a complex way it simultaneously hurts and invigorates, appropriates and gets appropriated, modifies and is modified, brings in existential and cultural crisis and also offers a blueprint for empowerment. This maneuverability and hardy commonsense enables the folk to affirmatively negotiate its temporality despite its internal contradictions or external exigencies. Morwal seems to have an undying faith in the intuitive yet ironic faculty of the folk that specially equips it with fortitude sans cynicism.

morval

Bhagwandas Morval

A Raja who died as a Faquir

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah
(No awards in 1956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973)

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah
(No awards in 1956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973)

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah
(No awards in 1956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973)

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Sahitya Akademi is India’s National Academy of Letters supported by government of India. Sahitya Akademi Award is one of the highest literary honor in India which annually confers on writers of outstanding works in one of the following twenty four major Indian languages that Sahiya Academi supports. Every year since its inception in 1954, the Sahitya Akademi awards prizes Aka. Awards-Brochureto the most outstanding books of literary merit published in any of the major Indian languages recognised by it. The award carries a monetary component (Rs. 50, 000) and a plaque. Sahitya Akademi gives twenty four awards to literary works in the languages it has recognised. These awards are given after an year-long process of scrutiny, discussion and selection. The awards are meant to recognise and promote excellence in Indian writing and expanding the very definition of Indian literature by acknowledging new trends and movements. They are a reflection of current tastes and contribute to the formation of an Indian sensibility.

The award of Assamese language started in 1955. No awards were in given in 956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973 in Assamese language category.

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah
(No awards in 1956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973)

Sahitya Academi – Assamese

Year Book Author
2007 Santanukulanandan (Novel) Purabi Bormudoi
2006 Cheneh Jorir Ganthi (Short Stories) Atulananda Goswami
2005 Mouna Ounth Mukhar Hriday (Novel) Yeshe Dorje Thongchi
2004 Manuh Anukule (Poetry) Hirendra Nath Dutta
2003 Anek Manuh Anek Thai Aru Nirjanata (Poetry) Bireswar Barua
2002 Mahat Oitiyya (Criticism) Nalinidhar Bhattacharyya
2001 Edhani Mahir Hanhi (Novel) Mahim Bora
2000 Baghe Tapur Rati (Short stories) Apurba Sarma
1999 Biponna Samay (Novel) Medini Choudhury
1998 Asirbadar Rang (Novel) Arun Sarma
1997 Andharat Nijar Mukh (Short stories) Nagen Saikia
1996 Abhijatri (Novel) Nirupama Borgohain
1995 Maharathi (Novel) Chandra Prasad Saikia
1994 Madhupur Bahudur (Short stories) Sheelbhadra (Rabati Mohan Datta Choudhury)
1993 Mor Je Kiman Hepah (Poetry) Keshav Mahanta
1992 Shaichar Pathar Manuh (Poetry) Hiren Bhattacharjya
1991 Brahmaputra Ityadi Padya (Poetry) Ajit Barua
1990 Snehadevir Ekuki Galpa (Short stories) *Sneha Devi
1989 Asamiya Jatiya Jivanata Mahapurushiya Parampara (Literary criticism) Hiren Gohian
1988 Patal Bahirabi (Novel) Lakshminandan Bora
1987 Aan Ejan (Poetry) Harekrishna Deka
1986 Benudhar Sarma (Biography) Tirthanath Sarma
1985 Krishna Kanta Handiqui Rachna-Sambhar (Literary criticism) *Krishnakanta Handiqui
1984 Jangam (Novel) *Devendra Nath Acharya
1983 Sudirgha Din Aru Ritu (Poetry) Nirmalprabha Bardoloi
1982 Mamare Dhara Tarowal Aru Dukhan Upanyasa (Novel) Indira Goswami (Mamoni Raisom Goswami)
1981 Kavita (Poetry) Nilamani Phookan (Jr.)
1980 Prithibir Asukh (Short stories) Jogesh Das
1979 Sonali Jahaj (Poetry) Bhaben Barua
1978 Pita Putra (Novel) Homen Borgohain
1977 Bakul Banar Kavita (Poetry) Anand Chandra Barua
1976 Srinkhal (Short stories) Bhabendra Nath Saikia
1975 Kaka Deutar Har (Novel) Navakanta Barua
1974 Golam (Short stories) Saurabh Kumar Chaliha
1972 Aghari Atmar Kahini (Novel) Syed Abdul Malik
1970 Mahatmar Pora Rupkonarloi (Reminiscenses) Lakshminath Phookan
1969 Manchalekha (Study of Assamese theatre) Atul Chandra Hazarika
1968 Alakananda (Poetry) Nalinibala Devi
1967 Adhunik Galpa Sahitya (Literary criticism) Trailokyanath Goswami
1966 Bedanar Ulka (Poetry) Ambikagiri Roychoudhuri
1964 Asamar Lok-Sanskriti (Study in Folk culture) *Birinchi Kumar Barua
1961 Iyaruingam (Novel) Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya
1960 Kangrechar Kachiyali Ra’dat (Reminiscences) Benudhar Sarma
1955 Bana Phul (Poetry) Jatindranath Dowerah
(No awards in 1956,1957,1958,1959,1962,1963,1965,1971 and 1973)

Pratilipi published 2nd issue

www.pratilipi.in has published its second issue. According to the announcement of the editors of Pratilipi, “Pratilipi’s inaugural issue did not take readers, writers, publishers or governments by storm. We didn’t expect that. It did not set new standards for (online) literary journalism. We didn’t expect that either. It didn’t have five hundred visitors a day and that too was not unexpected. Did we expect anything, then? Yes, we expected it to be enjoyed by readers/writers once they came to visit/read it. And they did. At least, most of them.” Now it is time for the second issue. Giriraj Kiradoo and Rahul Soni, editors of Pratilipi, anticipated it to be a tougher task than it turned out to be.

The contents of the second issue contains some important features: Ann J�derlund : 12 Poems Introduced by Staffan Soderblom,� Vishesh � Ek Tilismi Upakhyaan : Wagish Shukla, Badri Narayan on the Role of Dalits in the 1857 Revolt, Self and the Death: Rustam Singh, Malayj’s Letters. In the fiction section Krishna Baldev Vaid, Sampurna Chattarji, Teji Grover, Sara Rai, Sangeeta Gundecha have contributed.

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