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Gandhi’s Economic Ideas in Today’s Context

by Ikshula

The world today faces challenges of different forms ranging from ecological disaster to terrorist violence and from deaths from malnutrition to problems emanating from plenty. The world, whether it is the affluent North or the developing South, seems to be running in a mad race. Two separate races, almost oblivious of each other, are going on simultaneously on the world map – one race is of affluent people who are clamouring for more and the other is for mere survival where people are striving hard to make both ends meet.  And this is where Gandhiji’s ideas hold great value for today’s world – his emphasis on ‘aparigrah’ (non-possessiveness’) and his idea of ‘Swaraj’ under which each individual, he thought, would be enabled to control his or her life independent of state power and where villages/gram sabhas would be self-dependent and self-sufficient.

“Our Earth has enough for everyone’s need but not for anyone’s greed” – This is what Mahatama Gandhi said almost a century ago and there is no doubt that this holds good today.

Gandhiji’s famous Talisman that you recall the face of the poorest and the weakest man and consider whether your act is going to be of any use to him, should be our Mantra.  And this talisman should be our philosophy of life if we have to achieve the larger objective of ‘Swaraj’ and inclusive growth.

Human happiness was the main criterion for Gandhiji and he thought that progress should be measured in terms of human happiness. He did not believe in the modern view of an affluent society in which material development is the sole criterion of progress. He supported the concept of ‘SARVODAYA’, the greatest good of all. His vision of Swaraj was  a society in which every man would have dignified life, and equal opportunities to grow. He envisaged a society in which economic progress and social justice would go hand in hand.

As our late Prime Minister and a Gandhian, Morarji Desai wrote in an Essay “Gandhiji And the Destiny of Man” that Gandhiji demonstrated to the world the strength of man’s invincible soul when it was pitted against physical force or military might; of moral values as against material ones; and of service and sacrifice as against selfishness and acquisitiveness. He taught us the beauty of truth and the sublimity of the human spirit.

Gandhiji was not opposed to material prosperity nor did he reject the use of machines in all circumstances. He felt that machinery should save time and labour for all. He did not want man to become a slave of machines and lose his identity altogether; he wanted machines to be for man, not man for machines.

In Gandhi’s own words: “Economic equality is the master-key to non-violent independence… A non-violent system of government is clearly an impossibility so long as the wide gulf between the rich and the hungry millions persists. The contrast between the palaces of New Delhi and the miserable hovels of the poor, laboring class cannot last one day in a free India in which the poor will enjoy the same power as the richest in the land.”

As a Gandhian scholar Sunil points out in one of his recently published articles that the high consumption levels being presently practiced and espoused, cannot be available to the whole humanity. Even where available and achievable, the cult of consumerism has not made the life and society happier and healthier. It has brought its own distortions and social crises. And worse, it has brought the ecology and environment of the earth to the brink of disaster.

If we go by Gandhian view, the villages will have to made self-dependent economic units. No doubt that a significant part of the village population has to be diverted to industries. But those industries will be small unit, labour-intensive and mainly village based. Villages and small towns have to be again made centre of development. For inclusive growth, we will have to promote the industries which provide employment in rural areas and bring prosperity and basic facilities to villages.

The National Employment Rural Guarantee Scheme is a concrete step in this direction. The Scheduled Tribe and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Rights) Act, 2006, has been rightly hailed as landmark legislation. However, there is a need to do much more to achieve the larger objectives like inclusive growth and to eliminate hunger and malnutrition from the country. Since Gandhi, one of the greatest leaders of mankind, was born here, we should ensure that the ‘the face of the poorest and the weakest  remains at the centre of our planning and development. (PIB Features)

Gandhi’s Economic Ideas in Today’s Context

by Ikshula

The world today faces challenges of different forms ranging from ecological disaster to terrorist violence and from deaths from malnutrition to problems emanating from plenty. The world, whether it is the affluent North or the developing South, seems to be running in a mad race. Two separate races, almost oblivious of each other, are going on simultaneously on the world map – one race is of affluent people who are clamouring for more and the other is for mere survival where people are striving hard to make both ends meet.  And this is where Gandhiji’s ideas hold great value for today’s world – his emphasis on ‘aparigrah’ (non-possessiveness’) and his idea of ‘Swaraj’ under which each individual, he thought, would be enabled to control his or her life independent of state power and where villages/gram sabhas would be self-dependent and self-sufficient.

“Our Earth has enough for everyone’s need but not for anyone’s greed” – This is what Mahatama Gandhi said almost a century ago and there is no doubt that this holds good today.

Gandhiji’s famous Talisman that you recall the face of the poorest and the weakest man and consider whether your act is going to be of any use to him, should be our Mantra.  And this talisman should be our philosophy of life if we have to achieve the larger objective of ‘Swaraj’ and inclusive growth.

Human happiness was the main criterion for Gandhiji and he thought that progress should be measured in terms of human happiness. He did not believe in the modern view of an affluent society in which material development is the sole criterion of progress. He supported the concept of ‘SARVODAYA’, the greatest good of all. His vision of Swaraj was  a society in which every man would have dignified life, and equal opportunities to grow. He envisaged a society in which economic progress and social justice would go hand in hand.

As our late Prime Minister and a Gandhian, Morarji Desai wrote in an Essay “Gandhiji And the Destiny of Man” that Gandhiji demonstrated to the world the strength of man’s invincible soul when it was pitted against physical force or military might; of moral values as against material ones; and of service and sacrifice as against selfishness and acquisitiveness. He taught us the beauty of truth and the sublimity of the human spirit.

Gandhiji was not opposed to material prosperity nor did he reject the use of machines in all circumstances. He felt that machinery should save time and labour for all. He did not want man to become a slave of machines and lose his identity altogether; he wanted machines to be for man, not man for machines.

In Gandhi’s own words: “Economic equality is the master-key to non-violent independence… A non-violent system of government is clearly an impossibility so long as the wide gulf between the rich and the hungry millions persists. The contrast between the palaces of New Delhi and the miserable hovels of the poor, laboring class cannot last one day in a free India in which the poor will enjoy the same power as the richest in the land.”

As a Gandhian scholar Sunil points out in one of his recently published articles that the high consumption levels being presently practiced and espoused, cannot be available to the whole humanity. Even where available and achievable, the cult of consumerism has not made the life and society happier and healthier. It has brought its own distortions and social crises. And worse, it has brought the ecology and environment of the earth to the brink of disaster.

If we go by Gandhian view, the villages will have to made self-dependent economic units. No doubt that a significant part of the village population has to be diverted to industries. But those industries will be small unit, labour-intensive and mainly village based. Villages and small towns have to be again made centre of development. For inclusive growth, we will have to promote the industries which provide employment in rural areas and bring prosperity and basic facilities to villages.

The National Employment Rural Guarantee Scheme is a concrete step in this direction. The Scheduled Tribe and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Rights) Act, 2006, has been rightly hailed as landmark legislation. However, there is a need to do much more to achieve the larger objectives like inclusive growth and to eliminate hunger and malnutrition from the country. Since Gandhi, one of the greatest leaders of mankind, was born here, we should ensure that the ‘the face of the poorest and the weakest  remains at the centre of our planning and development. (PIB Features)

Gandhi’s Economic Ideas in Today’s Context

— Ikshula

The world today faces challenges of different forms ranging from ecological disaster to terrorist violence and from deaths from malnutrition to problems emanating from plenty. The world, whether it is the affluent North or the developing South, seems to be running in a mad race. Two separate races, almost oblivious of each other, are going on simultaneously on the world map – one race is of affluent people who are clamouring for more and the other is for mere survival where people are striving hard to make both ends meet.  And this is where Gandhiji’s ideas hold great value for today’s world – his emphasis on ‘aparigrah’ (non-possessiveness’) and his idea of ‘Swaraj’ under which each individual, he thought, would be enabled to control his or her life independent of state power and where villages/gram sabhas would be self-dependent and self-sufficient.

“Our Earth has enough for everyone’s need but not for anyone’s greed” – This is what Mahatama Gandhi said almost a century ago and there is no doubt that this holds good today.

Gandhiji’s famous Talisman that you recall the face of the poorest and the weakest man and consider whether your act is going to be of any use to him, should be our Mantra.  And this talisman should be our philosophy of life if we have to achieve the larger objective of ‘Swaraj’ and inclusive growth.

Human happiness was the main criterion for Gandhiji and he thought that progress should be measured in terms of human happiness. He did not believe in the modern view of an affluent society in which material development is the sole criterion of progress. He supported the concept of ‘SARVODAYA’, the greatest good of all. His vision of Swaraj was  a society in which every man would have dignified life, and equal opportunities to grow. He envisaged a society in which economic progress and social justice would go hand in hand.

As our late Prime Minister and a Gandhian, Morarji Desai wrote in an Essay “Gandhiji And the Destiny of Man” that Gandhiji demonstrated to the world the strength of man’s invincible soul when it was pitted against physical force or military might; of moral values as against material ones; and of service and sacrifice as against selfishness and acquisitiveness. He taught us the beauty of truth and the sublimity of the human spirit.

Gandhiji was not opposed to material prosperity nor did he reject the use of machines in all circumstances. He felt that machinery should save time and labour for all. He did not want man to become a slave of machines and lose his identity altogether; he wanted machines to be for man, not man for machines.

In Gandhi’s own words: “Economic equality is the master-key to non-violent independence… A non-violent system of government is clearly an impossibility so long as the wide gulf between the rich and the hungry millions persists. The contrast between the palaces of New Delhi and the miserable hovels of the poor, laboring class cannot last one day in a free India in which the poor will enjoy the same power as the richest in the land.”

As a Gandhian scholar Sunil points out in one of his recently published articles that the high consumption levels being presently practiced and espoused, cannot be available to the whole humanity. Even where available and achievable, the cult of consumerism has not made the life and society happier and healthier. It has brought its own distortions and social crises. And worse, it has brought the ecology and environment of the earth to the brink of disaster.

If we go by Gandhian view, the villages will have to made self-dependent economic units. No doubt that a significant part of the village population has to be diverted to industries. But those industries will be small unit, labour-intensive and mainly village based. Villages and small towns have to be again made centre of development. For inclusive growth, we will have to promote the industries which provide employment in rural areas and bring prosperity and basic facilities to villages.

The National Employment Rural Guarantee Scheme is a concrete step in this direction. The Scheduled Tribe and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Rights) Act, 2006, has been rightly hailed as landmark legislation. However, there is a need to do much more to achieve the larger objectives like inclusive growth and to eliminate hunger and malnutrition from the country. Since Gandhi, one of the greatest leaders of mankind, was born here, we should ensure that the ‘the face of the poorest and the weakest  remains at the centre of our planning and development. (PIB Features)

Historic Delhi : Visual history of the capital of the country

The Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India Shri Jawhar Sircar today inaugurated an exhibition titled “Historic Delhi: Early Explorations of the Camera, c.1860-1950”at National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi. The exhibition has been presented in collaboration with Alkazi Foundation and will remain open for public viewing from October 1, 2010 till November 7, 2010, 10 a.m. -5 p.m. (closed on Monday). The exhibition is drawn from the extensive Alkazi Collection of Photography based in New Delhi.

Photography was introduced in India in the 1840s. There began a gradual setting up of the photographic societies in India henceforth, from 1855 onwards in Calcutta, Bombay and Madras. The medium received patronage not only from the elite rulers and professional practitioners who set up studios, but also from the British administration, to document and survey the entire country.

Says Prof Rajeev Lochan, Director NGMA: “The exhibition Historic Delhi showcases the earliest known photographs of India- dating back from 1860’s. Capturing the essence of the evolution of modernity in visual form, Historic Delhi documents the birth of photography in India, gives us for the first time a visual history of the capital of the country, and challenges our perception of the city we live in. NGMA is proud to show this important exhibition of landmark photography at a time the city celebrates the Commonwealth Games”

The history of photography in Delhi is also due in part to the coming of early artists and painters who traveled here and so photography can also be considered a continuation of those forms of visualization. The early picturesque painters such as the Daniells, spent over 10 years here, in the 18th Century, traveling the country, often in the footsteps of other itinerant painters, such as William Hodges. These painters were affected by ideas of the sublime and beautiful. Other artists from the Company School in India (1775-1910), who were patronized by Europeans, also created a visual language akin to that of photography by documenting the trades and professions of those who resided in the city.

The coming of early photography to Delhi and other Northern states was therefore influenced by the above and one of the earliest professional photographers here was Samuel Bourne, from the later established company of Bourne and Shepherd. Delhi emerges as a city in the immediate aftermath of the Uprising of 1857. Most of the sites therefore captured by photographers are those affected by the mutiny and later led to the demoralization of the sites by the British to keep alive the memory of their deceased. Similarly, with the transfer of power to the British Crown, the Durbars of Delhi in 1877, 1903 and 1911, conducted under the supervision of the three Viceroys, leads to the visualization of Delhi as an imperial capital. The 1911 Durbar therefore leads to the transfer of all administrative power to Delhi from Calcutta and even the reversal of the partition of Bengal. Delhi pays host to over 250,000 people in the last durbar.

Historic Delhi : Visual history of the capital of the country

The Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India Shri Jawhar Sircar today inaugurated an exhibition titled “Historic Delhi: Early Explorations of the Camera, c.1860-1950”at National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi. The exhibition has been presented in collaboration with Alkazi Foundation and will remain open for public viewing from October 1, 2010 till November 7, 2010, 10 a.m. -5 p.m. (closed on Monday). The exhibition is drawn from the extensive Alkazi Collection of Photography based in New Delhi.

Photography was introduced in India in the 1840s. There began a gradual setting up of the photographic societies in India henceforth, from 1855 onwards in Calcutta, Bombay and Madras. The medium received patronage not only from the elite rulers and professional practitioners who set up studios, but also from the British administration, to document and survey the entire country.

Says Prof Rajeev Lochan, Director NGMA: “The exhibition Historic Delhi showcases the earliest known photographs of India- dating back from 1860’s. Capturing the essence of the evolution of modernity in visual form, Historic Delhi documents the birth of photography in India, gives us for the first time a visual history of the capital of the country, and challenges our perception of the city we live in. NGMA is proud to show this important exhibition of landmark photography at a time the city celebrates the Commonwealth Games”

The history of photography in Delhi is also due in part to the coming of early artists and painters who traveled here and so photography can also be considered a continuation of those forms of visualization. The early picturesque painters such as the Daniells, spent over 10 years here, in the 18th Century, traveling the country, often in the footsteps of other itinerant painters, such as William Hodges. These painters were affected by ideas of the sublime and beautiful. Other artists from the Company School in India (1775-1910), who were patronized by Europeans, also created a visual language akin to that of photography by documenting the trades and professions of those who resided in the city.

The coming of early photography to Delhi and other Northern states was therefore influenced by the above and one of the earliest professional photographers here was Samuel Bourne, from the later established company of Bourne and Shepherd. Delhi emerges as a city in the immediate aftermath of the Uprising of 1857. Most of the sites therefore captured by photographers are those affected by the mutiny and later led to the demoralization of the sites by the British to keep alive the memory of their deceased. Similarly, with the transfer of power to the British Crown, the Durbars of Delhi in 1877, 1903 and 1911, conducted under the supervision of the three Viceroys, leads to the visualization of Delhi as an imperial capital. The 1911 Durbar therefore leads to the transfer of all administrative power to Delhi from Calcutta and even the reversal of the partition of Bengal. Delhi pays host to over 250,000 people in the last durbar.

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Release of Media ka Underworld on 4th Oct

Media Ka Underworld‘Media ka Underworld’ is a new book by well known journalist Dilip Mandal that is going to be released in Lucknow on 4th October. From few years paid news is a hot issue among Indian media panaroma and with refernece to this issue, this book tries to understand the media ownership, politics and its socialogy in new perspective. The releae fuction will be organized in the book fair in Lucknow. The book is piublished by Radhakrishan Prakashan.

Journalist Dilip Mandal is having the experience of working with all type of media- print, television and online. Mr Mandal is known for his commentary on existing socail and political issues.

Release of Media ka Underworld on 4th Oct

Media Ka Underworld‘Media ka Underworld’ is a new book by well known journalist Dilip Mandal that is going to be released in Lucknow on 4th October. From few years paid news is a hot issue among Indian media panaroma and with refernece to this issue, this book tries to understand the media ownership, politics and its socialogy in new perspective. The releae fuction will be organized in the book fair in Lucknow. The book is piublished by Radhakrishan Prakashan.

Journalist Dilip Mandal is having the experience of working with all type of media- print, television and online. Mr Mandal is known for his commentary on existing socail and political issues.

media-ka-underworld

media-ka-underworld

Tagore Commemoration Grant Scheme started

To celebrate the 150th birth anniversary of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore, Government of India has constituted a National Committee under the Chairmanship of the Prime Minister and a National Implementation Committee under the Finance Minister, to plan and take up commemorative programmes and projects at the national and international level. The National Committee has also advised the Ministry of Culture to support initiatives by different organizations to conduct appropriate commemorative programmes. The National Implementation Committee, thereafter, decided that the Ministry of Culture may launch a scheme and accordingly, the Ministry of Culture now launches the ‘Scheme of Financial Assistance for Cultural Programmes by Not-for-Profit Organizations to Commemorate 150 Years of Rabindranath Tagore’, known in short as the ‘Tagore Commemoration Grant Scheme’ (TCGS). The Scheme will assist and support the programmes related to appropriate and befitting commemoration of the multifaceted genius of Rabindranath Tagore and his enduring contributions. These may be through lectures, seminars, workshops, symposia, cultural shows, literary festivals, exhibitions, small documentary films and audio-video presentations, etc.

All eligible Not-for-Profit Organizations working for the promotion of art and culture and Universities (including University’s Centres and Institutions, but not University Departments, schools or colleges) are eligible to apply for this Grant. Central Government assistance is limited to 75% of the estimated cost of a proposal/programme, with a ceiling of Rs. 5 lakhs. The Scheme shall remain open till May 2012.

Applications can be sent to the Conveners of the 8 Zonal Tagore Commemoration Committees, with offices at Kolkata, Guwahati, Allahabad, Delhi, Chandigarh, Udaipur, Mumbai and Chennai. Experts will evaluate the proposals and their decision will be final.

All the details related to the Scheme as well as the Application Forms are available on the Website of the Ministry of Culture www.indiaculture.nic.in

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